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Treatments for Overactive Bladder – Medications

When conservative treatments such as lifestyle changes and/or physical therapy do not improve your symptoms enough to improve your quality of life, your doctor can prescribe certain medications to treat the symptoms of OAB. Medication therapy may be used in combination with physical therapy and/or diet and fluid modification.

Medications to Help Manage OAB Symptoms

  • Anticholinergics/Antimuscarinics – Anticholinergics work by relaxing the bladder. Antimuscarinics work by preventing bladder spasms. These drugs can decrease the severe urge to urinate and may also enable the bladder to hold more urine without frequent leakage because the bladder is more relaxed.
  • Beta-3 Agonists – These are a class of medications that relax the bladder. As with most medications, it may take some time before you see an improvement in your OAB symptoms. Your urologist will monitor the medication’s effectiveness and dosage over several weeks to make sure the drug prescribed is working for you.

As with most medications, it may take some time before you see an improvement in your urge symptoms. Your physician will monitor the medication’s effectiveness and dosage over several weeks to make sure the drug prescribed is working for you.

Possible Side Effects

• Anticholinergics: dry mouth, constipation, and dry eyes
• Myrbetriq™ (mirabegron): headaches

Re-evaluation

If more conservative therapies and medication therapy are not completely successful at improving your OAB symptoms, your urologist will re-evaluate your symptoms and plan of care.

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